CHI 2011

How do cues in our digital environment influence our attention? How do we use these cues to make sense of others behavior?
I have been examining these questions in my recent research.

I presented two related papers at the ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2011) in Vancouver, BC May 6th to the 12th:

Dabbish, L., Mark, G., & Gonzales, V. (2011). Why do I keep interrupting myself?: Self-interruption, habit, and environment. To appear in Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2011), Vancouver, CA.

In this note, we examined whether environmental factors and individual differences influence the amount of self-interruption by information workers across three organizational settings.

Wainer, J., Dabbish, L., & Kraut, R. (2011). Should I open this email?: Curiosity and attention to email messages. To appear in Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2011), Vancouver, CA.

In this paper, we examined attention to email messages. We found that curiosity strongly increased the likelihood of reading certain messages over others. Curiosity was generated by partial information at the inbox level and operated in a largely intrinsic way, diminished by salient cues of message value and cognitive demand.

Before the conference started, my students and I also participated in two great workshops.

At the workshop on Personal Informatics & HCI: Design, Theory, & Social Implications I talked about SeeMail (Dabbish, L., & Wise, Z. (2011). SeeMail: Visualizing Email Response.) a system we’ve created to give users an overview of their email behavior over time. The visualizations support inferences about relationship strength, norms, and attention allocation.

At the workshop on Transnational HCI, my PhD student Jennifer Marlow presented our work applying construal theory to inform interventions that reduce psychological distance in distributed teams: (Marlow, J. & Dabbish, L. (2011). Reducing Psychological Distance in Distributed Teams.).

It was a great conference and I’m looking forward to CHI 2012 in Austin, Texas!